Can SARS-CoV-2 be inactivated by resonance induced by sound waves at the ultrasound frequency?


In a recent study published in bioRxiv* prepress server, researchers in the laboratory Experiments to test the ability of different frequencies of ultrasound to inactivate the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).

Study: Ultrasound treatment inhibits SARS-CoV-2 in vitro infection.  Image credit: NicoElNino/Shutterstock
Stady: Ultrasound treatment inhibits SARS-CoV-2 infection in vitro. Image credit: NicoElNino/Shutterstock

background

The coronavirus pandemic 2019 (COVID-19) has led to the rapid development of many vaccines and antiviral treatments. Research on COVID-19 has expanded to areas beyond biology and medicine, including physics, engineering, and artificial intelligence.

A team of researchers has proposed using ultrasound frequencies to inactivate viral proteins and neutralize SARS-CoV-2. This hypothesis has been tested through theoretical experiments to study interactions between SARS-CoV-2 Spike Proteins and ultrasound harmonics. However, the hypothesis has not yet been tested using in the laboratory experiments.

about studying

In the current study, the researchers produced a viral stock of the Wuhan strain 1 SARS-CoV-2 and its gamma and delta variants under biosafety level three conditions. Solutions containing SARS-CoV-2 variants were exposed to different ultrasound frequencies ranging from 3 to 12 MHz, 5 to 10 MHz, and 6 to 18 MHz for 30 minutes.

Vero E6 cells were then infected with SARS-CoV-2 culture media exposed to ultrasound frequencies and those not exposed to ultrasound and incubated for 1 day. Vero E6 cells were then subjected to immunofluorescence staining for SARS-CoV-2 protein and double-stranded ribonucleic acid (dsRNA) to detect SARS-CoV-2 repeat. in the laboratory. Infection and virus replication in cells were evaluated using confocal microscopy and immunofluorescence.

Tissue culture medium infectious dose (TCID50) assays were used to evaluate viral particles. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed to determine the statistical significance of the results.

consequences

Results reported that ultrasound frequencies of 3-12MHz, 5-10MHz, and 6-18MHz inhibited viral replication of Wuhan-Ho-1 strain, but only 5-10MHz showed any virucidal effect against SARS. -2 gamma and delta variables.

Infection of Vero E6 cells with ultrasound-treated viral stocks revealed that exposure to ultrasound frequencies 3–12 MHz and 5–10 MHz significantly reduced viral titers of the Wuhan-Hu-1 strain but not of SARS-CoV-2 Gamma or SARS-CoV-2 Gamma. delta variables. The viral culture showed no change in temperature upon exposure to different ultrasound frequencies.

While the hypothesis initially suggested that high frequencies between 100 and 500 MHz could disrupt the viral shield and spike proteins, low frequencies between one and 20 MHz were also thought to be effective in damaging tropocollagen and the α-helix structures of the spike protein. The present results revealed that ultrasound frequencies used in everyday medicine that are considered safe can effectively neutralize some strains of SARS-CoV-2.

conclusions

To summarize, the study investigated the use of different ultrasound frequencies to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 protein structure and neutralize the virus. Viral replication tested in Vero E6 cells revealed that Wuhan-Hu-1 strain replication was inhibited by the ultrasound frequency ranges 3–12 MHz and 5–10 MHz, but cell cultures inoculated with SARS-CoV-2 Gamma and Delta variants Low viral titers were shown only when viruses were exposed to ultrasound frequencies 5-10 MHz.

The results indicated that the ultrasound frequencies produced by medical devices in daily use can be used to inactivate SARS-CoV-2. Ultrasound inhibition can be used with other antivirals to reduce viral titers of SARS-CoV-2.

*Important note

bioRxiv publishes preliminary scientific reports that are not peer-reviewed and therefore should not be considered conclusive, directing clinical practice/health-related behaviour, or treated as hard information.



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