Was that video propaganda? TikTok is trying to help, sort of.


The platform announced on January 18 that TikTok will expand its labels on content from state-controlled media.

from now on, Tik Tok It will add the designation “state-controlled media” to accounts “whose editorial output or decision-making process is subject to government censorship or influence.” The move, which started to address content in Russia, Ukraine and Belarus, will now expand to lots of other countries.

“Our goal in ranking state media is to ensure that people have accurate, transparent, and actionable context when they interact with content from media accounts that may present the government’s view.” TikTok wrote in a statement(opens in a new window).

TikTok told Mashable that the new countries that will receive these stickers include Afghanistan, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary. Ireland, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Mongolia, Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Cyprus, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Kingdom The United States, the United States and Uzbekistan. This could include TikTok from a government president or department, or, in some cases, from government-influenced media. For example, Russia TV covers the majority of the country’s territory and is owned by the state, so it may get a label. Any accounts controlled by the government, either financially or editorially, are likely to get a sticker. TikTok follows Youtube(opens in a new window) And meta(opens in a new window)Two companies (mostly) are already doing this.

TikTok said in a press release that it has worked with a variety of experts “to ensure that people have accurate, transparent, and actionable context when they interact with content from media accounts that may present the government’s view.”

This comes at a time when TikTok is in hot water due to privacy concerns centered on the app’s ownership by Chinese company ByteDance. in the United States, Then-President Donald Trump tried – and failed – to ban the app in 2020(opens in a new window) Because of the fear that The Chinese government can see the app’s data(opens in a new window). lately, Congress, the US military, and dozens of US states have successfully banned the use of TikTok on government devices(opens in a new window) Because they still fear that user data – such as browsing history and location – could fall into the hands of the Chinese government. many Colleges and universities It followed suit, banning users from using the app on any university-owned device or scrolling through TikTok on university Wi-Fi.





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